Criton (trad. Cousin)

La bibliothèque libre.
Sauter à la navigation Sauter à la recherche
françaisEnglish

Œuvres de Platon,
traduites par Victor Cousin
Tome premier


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


CRITON,


OU


LE DEVOIR DU CITOYEN.


———───———


SOCRATE, CRITON.


SOCRATE.

Contents

Introduction

Introduction by Benjamin Jowett

Crito

Persons of the dialogue:

  • Socrates,
  • Crito.

Scene:

  • The Prison of Socrates.
Crito appears at break of dawn in the prison of Socrates, whom he finds asleep.

SOCRATES:

POURQUOI déjà venu, Criton ? N’est‑il pas encore bien matin ?

CRITON.

Il est vrai.

SOCRATE.

Quelle heure peut‑il être ?

CRITON.

L’aurore paraît à peine.

SOCRATE.

Je m’étonne que le gardien de la prison t’ait laissé entrer.

CRITON.

Il est déjà habitué à moi, pour m’avoir vu souvent ici ; d’ailleurs il m’a quelque obligation.

SOCRATE.

Arrives‑tu à l’instant, ou y a‑t‑il long-temps que tu es arrivé ?

CRITON.

Assez long-temps.

SOCRATE.

Pourquoi donc ne pas m’avoir éveillé sur-le-champ, au lieu de t’asseoir auprès de moi sans rien dire ?

CRITON.

Why have you come at this hour, Crito? it must be quite early.

CRITO:

Yes, certainly.

SOCRATES:

What is the exact time?

CRITO:

The dawn is breaking.

SOCRATES:

I wonder that the keeper of the prison would let you in.

CRITO:

He knows me, because I often come, Socrates; moreover, I have done him a kindness.

SOCRATES:

And are you only just arrived?

CRITO:

No, I came some time ago.

SOCRATES:

Then why did you sit and say nothing, instead of at once awakening me?

CRITO:

I should not have liked myself, Socrates, to be in such great trouble and unrest as you are—indeed I should not: I have been watching with amazement your peaceful slumbers; and for that reason I did not awake you, because I wished to minimize the pain. I have always thought you to be of a happy disposition; but never did I see anything like the easy, tranquil manner in which you bear this calamity.

SOCRATES:

Why, Crito, when a man has reached my age he ought not to be repining at the approach of death.

CRITO:

And yet other old men find themselves in similar misfortunes, and age does not prevent them from repining.

SOCRATES:

That is true. But you have not told me why you come at this early hour.

The ship from Delos is expected.

CRITO:

I come to bring you a message which is sad and painful; not, as I believe, to yourself, but to all of us who are your friends, and saddest of all to me.

SOCRATES:

What? Has the ship come from Delos, on the arrival of which I am to die?

CRITO:

No, the ship has not actually arrived, but she will probably be here to-day, as persons who have come from Sunium tell me that they left her there; and therefore to-morrow, Socrates, will be the last day of your life.

SOCRATES:

Very well, Crito; if such is the will of God, I am willing; but my belief is that there will be a delay of a day.

CRITO:

Why do you think so?

SOCRATES:

I will tell you. I am to die on the day after the arrival of the ship.

CRITO:

Yes; that is what the authorities say.

A vision of a fair woman who prophesies in the language of Homer that Socrates will die on the third day.

SOCRATES:

But I do not think that the ship will be here until to-morrow; this I infer from a vision which I had last night, or rather only just now, when you fortunately allowed me to sleep.

CRITO:

And what was the nature of the vision?

SOCRATES:

There appeared to me the likeness of a woman, fair and comely, clothed in bright raiment, who called to me and said: O Socrates,

‘The third day hence to fertile Phthia shalt thou go.’1

CRITO:

What a singular dream, Socrates!

SOCRATES:

There can be no doubt about the meaning, Crito, I think.

CRITO:

Yes; the meaning is only too clear. But, oh! my beloved Socrates, let me entreat you once more to take my advice and escape. For if you die I shall not only lose a friend who can never be replaced, but there is another evil: people who do not know you and me will believe that I might have saved you if I had been willing to give money, but that I did not care. Now, can there be a worse disgrace than this—that I should be thought to value money more than the life of a friend? For the many will not be persuaded that I wanted you to escape, and that you refused.

SOCRATES:

But why, my dear Crito, should we care about the opinion of the many? Good men, and they are the only persons who are worth considering, will think of these things truly as they occurred.

Crito by a variety of arguments tries to induce Socrates to make his escape. The means will be easily provided and without danger to any one.

CRITO:

But you see, Socrates, that the opinion of the many must be regarded, for what is now happening shows that they can do the greatest evil to any one who has lost their good opinion.

SOCRATES:

I only wish it were so, Crito; and that the many could do the greatest evil; for then they would also be able to do the greatest good—and what a fine thing this would be! But in reality they can do neither; for they cannot make a man either wise or foolish; and whatever they do is the result of chance.

CRITO:

Well, I will not dispute with you; but please to tell me, Socrates, whether you are not acting out of regard to me and your other friends: are you not afraid that if you escape from prison we may get into trouble with the informers for having stolen you away, and lose either the whole or a great part of our property; or that even a worse evil may happen to us? Now, if you fear on our account, be at ease; for in order to save you, we ought surely to run this, or even a greater risk; be persuaded, then, and do as I say.

SOCRATES:

Yes, Crito, that is one fear which you mention, but by no means the only one.

He is not justified in throwing away his life; he will be deserting his children, and will bring the reproach of cowardice on his friends.

CRITO:

Fear not—there are persons who are willing to get you out of prison at no great cost; and as for the informers they are far from being exorbitant in their demands—a little money will satisfy them. My means, which are certainly ample, are at your service, and if you have a scruple about spending all mine, here are strangers who will give you the use of theirs; and one of them, Simmias the Theban, has brought a large sum of money for this very purpose; and Cebes and many others are prepared to spend their money in helping you to escape. I say, therefore, do not hesitate on our account, and do not say, as you did in the court2, that you will have a difficulty in knowing what to do with yourself anywhere else. For men will love you in other places to which you may go, and not in Athens only; there are friends of mine in Thessaly, if you like to go to them, who will value and protect you, and no Thessalian will give you any trouble. Nor can I think that you are at all justified, Socrates, in betraying your own life when you might be saved; in acting thus you are playing into the hands of your enemies, who are hurrying on your destruction. And further I should say that you are deserting your own children; for you might bring them up and educate them; instead of which you go away and leave them, and they will have to take their chance; and if they do not meet with the usual fate of orphans, there will be small thanks to you. No man should bring children into the world who is unwilling to persevere to the end in their nurture and education. But you appear to be choosing the easier part, not the better and manlier, which would have been more becoming in one who professes to care for virtue in all his actions, like yourself. And indeed, I am ashamed not only of you, but of us who are your friends, when I reflect that the whole business will be attributed entirely to our want of courage. The trial need never have come on, or might have been managed differently; and this last act, or crowning folly, will seem to have occurred through our negligence and cowardice, who might have saved you, if we had been good for anything; and you might have saved yourself, for there was no difficulty at all. See now, Socrates, how sad and discreditable are the consequences, both to us and you. Make up your mind then, or rather have your mind already made up, for the time of deliberation is over, and there is only one thing to be done, which must be done this very night, and if we delay at all will be no longer practicable or possible; I beseech you therefore, Socrates, be persuaded by me, and do as I say.

Socrates is one of those who must be guided by reason.
Ought he to follow the opinion of the many or of the few, of the wise or of the unwise?

SOCRATES:

Dear Crito, your zeal is invaluable, if a right one; but if wrong, the greater the zeal the greater the danger; and therefore we ought to consider whether I shall or shall not do as you say. For I am and always have been one of those natures who must be guided by reason, whatever the reason may be which upon reflection appears to me to be the best; and now that this chance has befallen me, I cannot repudiate my own words: the principles which I have hitherto honoured and revered I still honour, and unless we can at once find other and better principles, I am certain not to agree with you; no, not even if the power of the multitude could inflict many more imprisonments, confiscations, deaths, frightening us like children with hobgoblin terrors3. What will be the fairest way of considering the question? Shall I return to your old argument about the opinions of men?—we were saying that some of them are to be regarded, and others not. Now were we right in maintaining this before I was condemned? And has the argument which was once good now proved to be talk for the sake of talking—mere childish nonsense? That is what I want to consider with your help, Crito:—whether, under my present circumstances, the argument appears to be in any way different or not; and is to be allowed by me or disallowed. That argument, which, as I believe, is maintained by many persons of authority, was to the effect, as I was saying, that the opinions of some men are to be regarded, and of other men not to be regarded. Now you, Crito, are not going to die to-morrow—at least, there is no human probability of this—and therefore you are disinterested and not liable to be deceived by the circumstances in which you are placed. Tell me then, whether I am right in saying that some opinions, and the opinions of some men only, are to be valued, and that other opinions, and the opinions of other men, are not to be valued. I ask you whether I was right in maintaining this?

CRITO:

Certainly.

SOCRATES:

The good are to be regarded, and not the bad?

CRITO:

Yes.

SOCRATES:

And the opinions of the wise are good, and the opinions of the unwise are evil?

CRITO:

Certainly.

SOCRATES:

And what was said about another matter? Is the pupil who devotes himself to the practice of gymnastics supposed to attend to the praise and blame and opinion of every man, or of one man only—his physician or trainer, whoever he may be?

CRITO:

Of one man only.

SOCRATES:

And he ought to fear the censure and welcome the praise of that one only, and not of the many?

CRITO:

Clearly so.

SOCRATES:

And he ought to act and train, and eat and drink in the way which seems good to his single master who has understanding, rather than according to the opinion of all other men put together?

CRITO:

True.

SOCRATES:

And if he disobeys and disregards the opinion and approval of the one, and regards the opinion of the many who have no understanding, will he not suffer evil?

CRITO:

Certainly he will.

SOCRATES:

And what will the evil be, whither tending and what affecting, in the disobedient person?

CRITO:

Clearly, affecting the body; that is what is destroyed by the evil.

The opinion of the one wise man is to be followed.

SOCRATES:

Very good; and is not this true, Crito, of other things which we need not separately enumerate? In questions of just and unjust, fair and foul, good and evil, which are the subjects of our present consultation, ought we to follow the opinion of the many and to fear them; or the opinion of the one man who has understanding? ought we not to fear and reverence him more than all the rest of the world: and if we desert him shall we not destroy and injure that principle in us which may be assumed to be improved by justice and deteriorated by injustice;—there is such a principle?

CRITO:

Certainly there is, Socrates.

SOCRATES:

Take a parallel instance:—if, acting under the advice of those who have no understanding, we destroy that which is improved by health and is deteriorated by disease, would life be worth having? And that which has been destroyed is—the body?

CRITO:

Yes.

SOCRATES:

Could we live, having an evil and corrupted body?

CRITO:

Certainly not.

SOCRATES:

And will life be worth having, if that higher part of man be destroyed, which is improved by justice and depraved by injustice? Do we suppose that principle, whatever it may be in man, which has to do with justice and injustice, to be inferior to the body?

CRITO:

Certainly not.

SOCRATES:

More honourable than the body?

CRITO:

Far more.

No matter what the many say of us.

SOCRATES:

Then, my friend, we must not regard what the many say of us: but what he, the one man who has understanding of just and unjust, will say, and what the truth will say. And therefore you begin in error when you advise that we should regard the opinion of the many about just and unjust, good and evil, honourable and dishonourable.—‘Well,’ some one will say, ‘but the many can kill us.’

CRITO:

Yes, Socrates; that will clearly be the answer.

Not life, but a good life, to be chiefly valued.

SOCRATES:

And it is true: but still I find with surprise that the old argument is unshaken as ever. And I should like to know whether I may say the same of another proposition—that not life, but a good life, is to be chiefly valued?

CRITO:

Yes, that also remains unshaken.

SOCRATES:

And a good life is equivalent to a just and honourable one—that holds also?

CRITO:

Yes, it does.

Admitting these principles, ought I to try and escape or not?

SOCRATES:

From these premisses I proceed to argue the question whether I ought or ought not to try and escape without the consent of the Athenians: and if I am clearly right in escaping, then I will make the attempt; but if not, I will abstain. The other considerations which you mention, of money and loss of character and the duty of educating one’s children, are, I fear, only the doctrines of the multitude, who would be as ready to restore people to life, if they were able, as they are to put them to death—and with as little reason. But now, since the argument has thus far prevailed, the only question which remains to be considered is, whether we shall do rightly either in escaping or in suffering others to aid in our escape and paying them in money and thanks, or whether in reality we shall not do rightly; and if the latter, then death or any other calamity which may ensue on my remaining here must not be allowed to enter into the calculation.

CRITO:

I think that you are right, Socrates; how then shall we proceed?

SOCRATES:

Let us consider the matter together, and do you either refute me if you can, and I will be convinced; or else cease, my dear friend, from repeating to me that I ought to escape against the wishes of the Athenians: for I highly value your attempts to persuade me to do so, but I may not be persuaded against my own better judgement. And now please to consider my first position, and try how you can best answer me.

CRITO:

I will.

May we sometimes do evil that good may come?

SOCRATES:

Are we to say that we are never intentionally to do wrong, or that in one way we ought and in another way we ought not to do wrong, or is doing wrong always evil and dishonourable, as I was just now saying, and as has been already acknowledged by us? Are all our former admissions which were made within a few days to be thrown away? And have we, at our age, been earnestly discoursing with one another all our life long only to discover that we are no better than children? Or, in spite of the opinion of the many, and in spite of consequences whether better or worse, shall we insist on the truth of what was then said, that injustice is always an evil and dishonour to him who acts unjustly? Shall we say so or not?

CRITO:

Yes.

SOCRATES:

Then we must do no wrong?

CRITO:

Certainly not.

SOCRATES:

Nor when injured injure in return, as the many imagine; for we must injure no one at all?4

CRITO:

Clearly not.

SOCRATES:

Again, Crito, may we do evil?

CRITO:

Surely not, Socrates.

May we render evil for evil?

SOCRATES:

And what of doing evil in return for evil, which is the morality of the many—is that just or not?

CRITO:

Not just.

SOCRATES:

For doing evil to another is the same as injuring him?

CRITO:

Very true.

Or is evil always to be deemed evil? Are you of the same mind as formerly about all this?

SOCRATES:

Then we ought not to retaliate or render evil for evil to any one, whatever evil we may have suffered from him. But I would have you consider, Crito, whether you really mean what you are saying. For this opinion has never been held, and never will be held, by any considerable number of persons; and those who are agreed and those who are not agreed upon this point have no common ground, and can only despise one another when they see how widely they differ. Tell me, then, whether you agree with and assent to my first principle, that neither injury nor retaliation nor warding off evil by evil is ever right. And shall that be the premiss of our argument? Or do you decline and dissent from this? For so I have ever thought, and continue to think; but, if you are of another opinion, let me hear what you have to say. If, however, you remain of the same mind as formerly, I will proceed to the next step.

Crito assents.

CRITO:

You may proceed, for I have not changed my mind.

Then ought Socrates to desert or not?

SOCRATES:

Then I will go on to the next point, which may be put in the form of a question:—Ought a man to do what he admits to be right, or ought he to betray the right?

CRITO:

He ought to do what he thinks right.

SOCRATES:

But if this is true, what is the application? In leaving the prison against the will of the Athenians, do I wrong any? or rather do I not wrong those whom I ought least to wrong? Do I not desert the principles which were acknowledged by us to be just—what do you say?

CRITO:

I cannot tell, Socrates; for I do not know.

The Laws come and argue with him.—Can a State exist in which law is set aside?

SOCRATES:

Then consider the matter in this way:—Imagine that I am about to play truant (you may call the proceeding by any name which you like), and the laws and the government come and interrogate me: ‘Tell us, Socrates,’ they say; ‘what are you about? are you not going by an act of yours to overturn us—the laws, and the whole state, as far as in you lies? Do you imagine that a state can subsist and not be overthrown, in which the decisions of law have no power, but are set aside and trampled upon by individuals?’ What will be our answer, Crito, to these and the like words? Any one, and especially a rhetorician, will have a good deal to say on behalf of the law which requires a sentence to be carried out. He will argue that this law should not be set aside; and shall we reply, ‘Yes; but the state has injured us and given an unjust sentence.’ Suppose I say that?

CRITO:

Very good, Socrates.

Has he any fault to find with them?
No man has any right to strike a blow at his country any more than at his father or mother.

SOCRATES:

‘And was that our agreement with you?’ the law would answer; ‘or were you to abide by the sentence of the state?’ And if I were to express my astonishment at their words, the law would probably add: ‘Answer, Socrates, instead of opening your eyes—you are in the habit of asking and answering questions. Tell us,—What complaint have you to make against us which justifies you in attempting to destroy us and the state? In the first place did we not bring you into existence? Your father married your mother by our aid and begat you. Say whether you have any objection to urge against those of us who regulate marriage?’ None, I should reply. ‘Or against those of us who after birth regulate the nurture and education of children, in which you also were trained? Were not the laws, which have the charge of education, right in commanding your father to train you in music and gymnastic?’ Right, I should reply. ‘Well then, since you were brought into the world and nurtured and educated by us, can you deny in the first place that you are our child and slave, as your fathers were before you? And if this is true you are not on equal terms with us; nor can you think that you have a right to do to us what we are doing to you. Would you have any right to strike or revile or do any other evil to your father or your master, if you had one, because you have been struck or reviled by him, or received some other evil at his hands?—you would not say this? And because we think right to destroy you, do you think that you have any right to destroy us in return, and your country as far as in you lies? Will you, O professor of true virtue, pretend that you are justified in this? Has a philosopher like you failed to discover that our country is more to be valued and higher and holier far than mother or father or any ancestor, and more to be regarded in the eyes of the gods and of men of understanding? also to be soothed, and gently and reverently entreated when angry, even more than a father, and either to be persuaded, or if not persuaded, to be obeyed? And when we are punished by her, whether with imprisonment or stripes, the punishment is to be endured in silence; and if she lead us to wounds or death in battle, thither we follow as is right; neither may any one yield or retreat or leave his rank, but whether in battle or in a court of law, or in any other place, he must do what his city and his country order him; or he must change their view of what is just: and if he may do no violence to his father or mother, much less may he do violence to his country.’ What answer shall we make to this, Crito? Do the laws speak truly, or do they not?

CRITO:

I think that they do.

The Laws argue that he has made an implied agreement with them which he is not at liberty to break at his pleasure.

SOCRATES:

Then the laws will say: ‘Consider, Socrates, if we are speaking truly that in your present attempt you are going to do us an injury. For, having brought you into the world, and nurtured and educated you, and given you and every other citizen a share in every good which we had to give, we further proclaim to any Athenian by the liberty which we allow him, that if he does not like us when he has become of age and has seen the ways of the city, and made our acquaintance, he may go where he pleases and take his goods with him. None of us laws will forbid him or interfere with him. Any one who does not like us and the city, and who wants to emigrate to a colony or to any other city, may go where he likes, retaining his property. But he who has experience of the manner in which we order justice and administer the state, and still remains, has entered into an implied contract that he will do as we command him. And he who disobeys us is, as we maintain, thrice wrong; first, because in disobeying us he is disobeying his parents; secondly, because we are the authors of his education; thirdly, because he has made an agreement with us that he will duly obey our commands; and he neither obeys them nor convinces us that our commands are unjust; and we do not rudely impose them, but give him the alternative of obeying or convincing us;—that is what we offer, and he does neither.

‘These are the sort of accusations to which, as we were saying, you, Socrates, will be exposed if you accomplish your intentions; you, above all other Athenians.’ Suppose now I ask, why I rather than anybody else? they will justly retort upon me that I above all other men have acknowledged the agreement. ‘There is clear proof,’ they will say, ‘Socrates, that we and the city were not displeasing to you. Of all Athenians you have been the most constant resident in the city, which, as you never leave, you may be supposed to love5. For you never went out of the city either to see the games, except once when you went to the Isthmus, or to any other place unless when you were on military service; nor did you travel as other men do. Nor had you any curiosity to know other states or their laws: your affections did not go beyond us and our state; we were your special favourites, and you acquiesced in our government of you; and here in this city you begat your children, which is a proof of your satisfaction. Moreover, you might in the course of the trial, if you had liked, have fixed the penalty at banishment; the state which refuses to let you go now would have let you go then. But you pretended that you preferred death to exile6, and that you were not unwilling to die. And now you have forgotten these fine sentiments, and pay no respect to us the laws, of whom you are the destroyer; and are doing what only a miserable slave would do, running away and turning your back upon the compacts and agreements which you made as a citizen. And first of all answer this very question: Are we right in saying that you agreed to be governed according to us in deed, and not in word only? Is that true or not?’ How shall we answer, Crito? Must we not assent?

CRITO:

We cannot help it, Socrates.

This agreement he is now going to break.

SOCRATES:

Then will they not say: ‘You, Socrates, are breaking the covenants and agreements which you made with us at your leisure, not in any haste or under any compulsion or deception, but after you have had seventy years to think of them, during which time you were at liberty to leave the city, if we were not to your mind, or if our covenants appeared to you to be unfair. You had your choice, and might have gone either to Lacedaemon or Crete, both which states are often praised by you for their good government, or to some other Hellenic or foreign state. Whereas you, above all other Athenians, seemed to be so fond of the state, or, in other words, of us her laws (and who would care about a state which has no laws?), that you never stirred out of her; the halt, the blind, the maimed were not more stationary in her than you were. And now you run away and forsake your agreements. Not so, Socrates, if you will take our advice; do not make yourself ridiculous by escaping out of the city.

If he does he will injure his friends and will disgrace himself.

‘For just consider, if you transgress and err in this sort of way, what good will you do either to yourself or to your friends? That your friends will be driven into exile and deprived of citizenship, or will lose their property, is tolerably certain; and you yourself, if you fly to one of the neighbouring cities, as, for example, Thebes or Megara, both of which are well governed, will come to them as an enemy, Socrates, and their government will be against you, and all patriotic citizens will cast an evil eye upon you as a subverter of the laws, and you will confirm in the minds of the judges the justice of their own condemnation of you. For he who is a corrupter of the laws is more than likely to be a corrupter of the young and foolish portion of mankind. Will you then flee from well-ordered cities and virtuous men? and is existence worth having on these terms? Or will you go to them without shame, and talk to them, Socrates? And what will you say to them? What you say here about virtue and justice and institutions and laws being the best things among men? Would that be decent of you? Surely not. But if you go away from well-governed states to Crito’s friends in Thessaly, where there is great disorder and licence, they will be charmed to hear the tale of your escape from prison, set off with ludicrous particulars of the manner in which you were wrapped in a goatskin or some other disguise, and metamorphosed as the manner is of runaways; but will there be no one to remind you that in your old age you were not ashamed to violate the most sacred laws from a miserable desire of a little more life? Perhaps not, if you keep them in a good temper; but if they are out of temper you will hear many degrading things; you will live, but how?—as the flatterer of all men, and the servant of all men; and doing what?—eating and drinking in Thessaly, having gone abroad in order that you may get a dinner. And where will be your fine sentiments about justice and virtue? Say that you wish to live for the sake of your children—you want to bring them up and educate them—will you take them into Thessaly and deprive them of Athenian citizenship? Is this the benefit which you will confer upon them? Or are you under the impression that they will be better cared for and educated here if you are still alive, although absent from them; for your friends will take care of them? Do you fancy that if you are an inhabitant of Thessaly they will take care of them, and if you are an inhabitant of the other world that they will not take care of them? Nay; but if they who call themselves friends are good for anything, they will—to be sure they will.

Let him think of justice first, and of life and children afterwards.

‘Listen, then, Socrates, to us who have brought you up. Think not of life and children first, and of justice afterwards, but of justice first, that you may be justified before the princes of the world below. For neither will you nor any that belong to you be happier or holier or juster in this life, or happier in another, if you do as Crito bids. Now you depart in innocence, a sufferer and not a doer of evil; a victim, not of the laws but of men. But if you go forth, returning evil for evil, and injury for injury, breaking the covenants and agreements which you have made with us, and wronging those whom you ought least of all to wrong, that is to say, yourself, your friends, your country, and us, we shall be angry with you while you live, and our brethren, the laws in the world below, will receive you as an enemy; for they will know that you have done your best to destroy us. Listen, then, to us and not to Crito.’

The mystic voice.

This, dear Crito, is the voice which I seem to hear murmuring in my ears, like the sound of the flute in the ears of the mystic; that voice, I say, is humming in my ears, and prevents me from hearing any other. And I know that anything more which you may say will be vain. Yet speak, if you have anything to say.

CRITO:

I have nothing to say, Socrates.

SOCRATES:

Leave me then, Crito, to fulfil the will of God, and to follow whither he leads.

Footnotes

1 Homer, Il. ix. 363.

2 Cp. Apol. 37 C, D.

3 Cp. Apol. 30 C.

4 e.g. cp. Rep. i. 335 E.

5 Cp. Phaedr. 230 C.

6 Cp. Apol. 37 D.


Par Jupiter ! Je m’en serais bien gardé ; pour moi, à ta place, je ne voudrais pas être éveillé dans une si triste conjoncture. Aussi, il y a déjà long-temps que je suis là, me livrant au plaisir de contempler la douceur de ton sommeil ; et je n’ai pas voulu t’éveiller pour te laisser passer le plus doucement possible ce qui te reste à vivre encore. Et, en vérité, Socrate, je t’ai félicité souvent de ton humeur pendant tout le cours de ta vie ; mais, dans le malheur présent, je te félicite bien plus encore de ta fermeté et de ta résignation.

SOCRATE.

C’est qu’il ne me siérait guère, Criton, de trouver mauvais qu’à mon âge il faille mourir.

CRITON.

Eh ! combien d’autres, Socrate, au même âge que toi, se trouvent en de pareils malheurs, que pourtant la vieillesse n’empêche pas de s’irriter contre leur sort !

SOCRATE.

Soit ; mais enfin quel motif t’amène si matin ?

CRITON.

Une nouvelle, Socrate, fâcheuse et accablante, non pas pour toi, à ce que je vois, mais pour moi et tous tes amis. Quant à moi, je le sens, j’aurai bien de la peine à la supporter.

SOCRATE.

Quelle nouvelle ? Est-il arrivé de Délos le vaisseau au retour duquel je dois mourir ?[1]

CRITON.

Non, pas encore ; mais il paraît qu’il doit arriver aujourd’hui, à ce que disent des gens qui viennent de Sunium[2], où ils l’ont laissé. Ainsi il ne peut manquer d’être ici aujourd’hui ; et demain matin, Socrate, il te faudra quitter la vie.

SOCRATE.
A la bonne heure, Criton : si telle est la volonté des dieux, qu’elle s’accomplisse. Cependant je ne pense pas qu’il arrive aujourd’hui.
CRITON.

Et pourquoi ?

SOCRATE.

Je vais te le dire. Ne dois‑je pas mourir le lendemain du jour où le vaisseau sera arrivé ?

CRITON.

C’est au moins ce que disent ceux de qui cela dépend.[3]

SOCRATE.

Eh bien ! Je ne crois pas qu’il arrive aujourd’hui, mais demain. Je le conjecture d’un songe que j’ai eu cette nuit, il n’y a qu’un moment ; et, à ce qu’il paraît, tu as bien fait de ne pas m’éveiller.

CRITON.

Quel est donc ce songe ?

SOCRATE.

Il m’a semblé voir une femme belle et majestueuse, ayant des vêtemens blancs, s’avancer vers moi, m’appeler, et me dire : Socrate,

Dans trois jours tu seras arrivé à la fertile Phthie.[4]
CRITON.
Voilà un songe étrange, Socrate !
SOCRATE.

Le sens est très clair, à ce qu’il me semble, Criton.

CRITON.

Beaucoup trop. Mais, ô mon cher Socrate ! Il en est temps encore, suis mes conseils, et sauve-toi ; car, pour moi, dans ta mort je trouverai plus d’un malheur : outre la douleur d’être privé de toi, d’un ami, tel que je n’en retrouverai jamais de pareil, j’ai encore à craindre que le vulgaire, qui ne nous connaît bien ni l’un ni l’autre, ne croie que, pouvant te sauver si j’avais voulu sacrifier quelque argent, j’ai négligé de le faire. Or, y a‑t‑il une réputation plus honteuse que de passer pour plus attaché à son argent qu’à ses amis ? Car jamais le vulgaire ne voudra se persuader que c’est toi qui as refusé de sortir d’ici, malgré nos instances.

SOCRATE.

Mais pourquoi, cher Criton, nous tant mettre en peine de l’opinion du vulgaire ? Les hommes sensés, dont il faut beaucoup plus s’occuper, sauront bien reconnaître comment les choses se seront véritablement passées.

CRITON.

Tu vois pourtant qu’il est nécessaire, Socrate, de se mettre en peine de l’opinion du vulgaire ; et ce qui arrive nous fait assez voir qu’il est non-seulement capable de faire un peu de mal, mais les maux les plus grands quand il écoute la calomnie.

SOCRATE.

Et plût aux dieux, Criton, que la multitude fût capable de faire les plus grands maux, pour qu’elle pût aussi faire les plus grands biens ! Ce serait une chose heureuse ; mais elle ne peut ni l’un ni l’autre, car il ne dépend pas d’elle de rendre les hommes sages ou insensés. Elle agit au hasard.

CRITON.

Eh bien soit ; mais dis-moi, Socrate, ne t’inquiètes-tu pas pour moi et tes autres amis ? Ne crains-tu pas que, si tu t’échappes, les délateurs nous fassent des affaires, nous accusent de t’avoir enlevé, et que nous soyons forcés de perdre toute notre fortune, ou de sacrifier beaucoup d’argent, et d’avoir peut-être à souffrir quelque chose de pis ? Si c’est là ce que tu crains, rassure-toi. Il est juste que pour te sauver, nous courions ces dangers, et de plus grands, s’il le faut. Ainsi crois-moi, suis le conseil que je te donne.

SOCRATE.
Oui, Criton, j’ai toutes ces inquiétudes, et bien d’autres encore.
CRITON.

Je puis donc te les ôter ; car on ne demande pas beaucoup d’argent pour te tirer d’ici et te mettre en sûreté ; et puis ne vois‑tu pas que ces délateurs sont à bon marché, et ne nous coûteront pas grand’chose. Ma fortune est à toi ; elle suffira, je pense ; et si, par intérêt pour moi, tu ne crois pas devoir en faire usage, il y a ici des étrangers qui mettent la leur à ta disposition. Un d’eux, Simmias de Thèbes[5], a apporté pour cela l’argent nécessaire ; Cébès[6] et beaucoup d’autres te font les mêmes offres. Ainsi, je te le répète, que ces craintes ne t’empêchent pas de pourvoir à ta sûreté ; et quant à ce que tu disais devant le tribunal, que si tu sortais d’ici, tu ne saurais que devenir, que cela ne t’embarrasse point. Partout où tu iras, tu seras aimé. Si tu veux aller en Thessalie, j’y ai des hôtes qui sauront t’apprécier, et qui te procureront un asile où tu seras à l’abri de toute inquiétude. Je te dirai plus, Socrate ; il me semble que ce n’est pas une action juste que de te livrer toi-même, quand tu peux te sauver, et de travailler, de tes propres mains, au succès de la trame ourdie par tes mortels ennemis. Ajoute à cela que tu trahis tes enfans ; que tu vas les abandonner, quand tu peux les nourrir et les élever ; que tu les livres, autant qu’il est en toi à la merci du sort, et aux maux qui sont le partage des orphelins. Il fallait ou ne pas avoir d’enfans, ou suivre leur destinée, et prendre la peine de les nourrir et de les élever. Mais, à te dire ce que je pense, tu as choisi le parti du plus faible des hommes, tandis que tu devais choisir celui d’un homme de cœur, toi surtout qui fais profession d’avoir cultivé la vertu pendant toute ta vie. Aussi, je rougis pour toi et pour nous, qui sommes tes amis ; j’ai grand’peur que tout ceci ne paraisse un effet de notre lâcheté, et cette accusation portée devant le tribunal, tandis qu’elle aurait pu ne pas l’être, et la manière dont le procès lui-même a été conduit, et cette dernière circonstance de ton refus bizarre, qui semble former le dénoûement ridicule de la pièce ; oui, on dira que c’est par une pusillanimité coupable que nous ne t’avons pas sauvé et que tu ne t’es pas sauvé toi-même, quand cela était possible, facile même, pour peu que chacun de nous eût fait son devoir. Songes-y donc, Socrate ; outre le mal qui t’arrivera, prends garde à la honte dont tu seras couvert, ainsi que tes amis. Consulte bien avec toi-même, ou plutôt il n’est plus temps de consulter, le conseil doit être pris, et il n’y a pas à choisir. La nuit prochaine, il faut que tout soit exécuté ; si nous tardons, tout est manqué, et nos mesures sont rompues. Ainsi, par toutes ces raisons, suis mon conseil, et fais ce que je te dis.

SOCRATE.
Mon cher Criton, on ne saurait trop estimer ta sollicitude, si elle s’accorde avec la justice ; autrement, plus elle est vive, et plus elle est fâcheuse. Il faut donc examiner si le devoir permet de faire ce que tu me proposes, ou non ; car ce n’est pas d’aujourd’hui que j’ai pour principe de n’écouter en moi d’autre voix que celle de la raison. Les principes que j’ai professés toute ma vie, je ne puis les abandonner parce qu’un malheur m’arrive : je les vois toujours du même œil ; ils me paraissent aussi puissants, aussi respectables qu’auparavant ; et si tu n’en as pas de meilleurs à leur substituer, sache bien que tu ne m’ébranleras pas, quand la multitude irritée, pour m’épouvanter comme un enfant, me présenterait des images plus affreuses encore que celles dont elle m’environne, les fers, la misère, la mort. Comment donc faire cet examen d’une manière convenable ? En reprenant ce que tu viens de dire sur l’opinion, en nous demandant à nous-mêmes si nous avions raison ou non de dire[7] si souvent qu’il y a des opinions auxquelles il faut avoir égard, d’autres qu’il faut dédaigner ; ou faisions-nous bien de parler ainsi avant que je fusse condamné à mort, et tout-à-coup avons-nous découvert que nous ne parlions que pour parler, et par pur badinage ? Je désire donc examiner avec toi, Criton, si nos principes d’alors me sembleront changés avec ma situation, ou s’ils me paraîtront toujours les mêmes ; s’il y faut renoncer, ou y conformer nos actions. Or, ce me semble, nous avons dit souvent ici, et nous entendions bien parler sérieusement, ce que je disais tout-à-l’heure, savoir, que parmi les opinions des hommes, il en est qui sont dignes de la plus haute estime, et, d’autres qui n’en méritent aucune. Criton, au nom des dieux, cela ne te semble-t-il pas bien dit ? Car, selon toutes les apparences humaines, tu n’es pas en danger de mourir demain, et la crainte d’un péril présent ne te fera pas prendre le change : penses-y donc bien. Ne trouves-tu pas que nous avons justement établi qu’il ne faut pas estimer toutes les opinions des hommes, mais, quelques-unes seulement, et non pas même de tous les hommes indifféremment, mais seulement de quelques-uns ? Qu’en dis-tu ? Cela ne te semble-t-il pas vrai ?
CRITON.

Fort vrai.

SOCRATE.

A ce compte ne faut‑il pas estimer les bonnes opinions, et mépriser les mauvaises ?

CRITON.

Certainement.

SOCRATE.

Les bonnes opinions ne sont‑ce pas celles des sages, et les mauvaises celles des fous ?

CRITON.

Qui en doute ?

SOCRATE.

Voyons, comment établissons-nous ce principe ? Un homme qui s’applique sérieusement à la gymnastique, est‑il touché de l’éloge et du blâme du premier venu, ou seulement de celui qui est médecin ou maître des exercices ?

CRITON.

De celui-là seulement.

SOCRATE.

C’est donc de celui-là seul qu’il doit redouter le blâme, et désirer l’éloge, sans s’inquiéter de ce qui vient des autres ?

CRITON.

Assurément.

SOCRATE.

Ainsi il faut qu’il fasse ses exercices, règle son régime, mange et boive sur l’avis de celui-là seul qui préside à la gymnastique et qui s’y connaît, plutôt que d’après l’opinion de tous les autres ensemble ?

CRITON.

Cela est incontestable.

SOCRATE.

Voilà donc qui est établi. Mais s’il désobéit au maître et dédaigne son avis et ses éloges, pour écouter la foule des gens qui n’y entendent rien, ne lui en arrivera‑t‑il pas de mal ?

CRITON.

Comment ne lui en arriverait‑il point ?

SOCRATE.

Mais ce mal de quelle nature est‑il ? Quels seront ses effets ? Et sur quelle partie de notre imprudent tombera‑t‑il ?

CRITON.

Sur son corps évidemment ; il le ruinera.

SOCRATE.

Fort bien ; et convenons, pour ne pas entrer dans les détails sans fin, qu’il en est ainsi de tout. Et bien ! sur le juste et l’injuste, sur l’honnête et le déshonnête, sur le bien et le mal, qui font présentement la matière de notre entretien, nous en rapporterons‑nous à l’opinion du peuple ou à celle d’un seul homme, si nous en trouvions un qui fût habile en ces matières, et ne devrions‑nous pas avoir plus de respect et plus de déférence pour lui, que pour tout le reste du monde ensemble ? Et si nous refusons de nous conformer à ses avis, ne ruinerons‑nous pas cette partie de nous-mêmes que la justice fortifie, et que l’injustice dégrade ? Ou tout cela n’a‑t‑il pas d’importance ?

CRITON.

Beaucoup, au contraire.

SOCRATE.

Voyons encore. Si nous ruinons en nous ce qu’un bon régime fortifie, ce qu’un régime malsain dégrade pour suivre l’avis de gens qui ne s’y connaissent pas, dis‑moi, pourrions‑nous vivre, cette partie de nous‑mêmes ainsi ruinée ? Et ici, c’est le corps, n’est‑ce pas ?

CRITON.

Sans doute.

SOCRATE.

Peut‑on vivre avec un corps flétri et ruiné ?

CRITON.

Non, assurément.

SOCRATE.

Et pourrons‑nous donc vivre, quand sera dégradé cette autre partie de nous‑mêmes dont la vertu est la force, et le vice la ruine ? Ou croyons‑nous moins précieuse que le corps, cette partie, quelle qu’elle soit, de notre être, à laquelle se rapportent le juste et l’injuste.

CRITON.

Point du tout.

SOCRATE.

N’est‑elle pas plus importante ?

CRITON.

Beaucoup plus.

SOCRATE.

Il ne faut donc pas, mon cher Criton, nous mettre tant en peine de ce que dira de nous la multitude, mais bien de ce qu’en dira celui qui connaît le juste et l’injuste ; et celui-là, Criton, ce juge unique de toutes nos actions, c’est la vérité. Tu vois donc bien que tu partais d’un faux principe, lorsque tu disais, au commencement, que nous devions nous inquiéter de l’opinion du peuple sur le juste, le bien et l’honnête, et sur leurs contraires. On dira peut-être : Mais enfin le peuple a le pouvoir de nous faire mourir.

CRITON.

C’est ce que l’on dira, assurément.

SOCRATE.

Et avec raison ; mais, mon cher Criton, je ne vois pas que cela détruise ce que nous avons établi. Examine encore ceci, je te prie : Le principe, que l’important n’est pas de vivre, mais de bien vivre, est‑il changé, ou subsiste‑t‑il ?

CRITON.

Il subsiste.

SOCRATE.

Et celui‑ci, que bien vivre, c’est vivre selon les lois de l’honnêteté et de la justice, subsiste-t‑il aussi ?

CRITON.

Sans doute.

SOCRATE.

D’après ces principes, dont nous convenons tous deux, il faut examiner s’il est juste ou non d’essayer de sortir d’ici sans l’aveu des Athéniens : si ce projet nous paraît juste, tentons‑le ; sinon, il y faut renoncer ; car pour toutes ces considérations que tu m’allègues, d’argent, de réputation, de famille, prends garde que ce soient là des considérations de ce peuple qui vous tue sans difficulté, et ensuite, s’il le pouvait, vous rappellerait à la vie avec aussi peu de raison. Songe que, selon les principes que nous avons établis, tout ce que nous avons à examiner, c’est, comme nous venons de le dire, si, en donnant de l’argent à ceux qui me tireront d’ici, et en contractant envers eux des obligations, nous nous conduirons suivant la justice, ou si, eux et nous, nous agirons injustement ; et qu’alors, si nous trouvons que la justice s’oppose à notre démarche, il n’y a plus à raisonner, il faut rester ici, mourir, souffrir tout, plutôt que de commettre une injustice.

CRITON.

On ne peut mieux dire, Socrate ; voyons ce que nous avons à faire.

SOCRATE.

Examinons-le ensemble, mon ami ; et si tu as quelque chose à objecter lorsque je parlerai, fais-le : je suis prêt à me rendre à tes raisons ; sinon, cesse enfin, je te prie, de me presser de sortir d’ici malgré les Athéniens ; car je serai ravi que tu me persuades de le faire, mais je n’entends pas y être forcé. Vois donc si tu seras satisfait de la manière dont je vais commencer cet examen, et ne me réponds que d’après ta conviction la plus intime.

CRITON.

Je le ferai.

SOCRATE.

Admettons-nous qu’il ne faut jamais commettre volontairement une injustice ? Ou l’injustice est-elle bonne dans certains cas, et mauvaise dans d’autres ? ou n’est-elle légitime dans aucune circonstance, comme nous en sommes convenus autrefois, et il n’y a pas long-temps encore ? Et cet heureux accord de nos âmes, quelques jours ont‑ils donc suffi pour le détruire ? Et se pourrait‑il, Criton, qu’à notre âge, nos plus sérieux entretiens n’eussent été, à notre insu, que des jeux d’enfans ? Ou plutôt n’est‑il pas vrai, comme nous le disions alors, que, soit que la foule en convienne ou non, qu’un sort plus rigoureux ou plus doux nous attende, cependant l’injustice en elle-même est toujours un mal ? Admettons‑nous ce principe, ou faut‑il le rejeter ?

CRITON.

Nous l’admettons.

SOCRATE.

C’est donc un devoir absolu de n’être jamais injuste ?

CRITON.

Sans doute.

SOCRATE.

Si c’est un devoir absolu de n’être jamais injuste, c’est donc aussi un devoir de ne l’être jamais même envers celui qui l’a été à notre égard, quoi qu’en dise le vulgaire ?

CRITON.

C’est bien mon avis.

SOCRATE.
Mais quoi ! est‑il permis de faire du mal à quelqu’un, ou ne l’est‑il pas ?
CRITON.

Non, assurément, Socrate.

SOCRATE.

Mais, enfin, rendre le mal pour le mal, est‑il juste comme le veut le peuple, ou injuste ?

CRITON.

Tout-à-fait injuste.

SOCRATE.

Car faire du mal, ou être injuste, c’est la même chose.

CRITON.

Sans doute.

SOCRATE.

Ainsi donc c’est une obligation sacrée de ne jamais rendre injustice pour injustice, ni mal pour mal. Mais prends garde, Criton, qu’en m’accordant ce principe, tu ne te fasses illusion sur ta véritable opinion ; car je, sais qu’il y a très peu de personnes qui l’admettent, et il y en aura toujours très peu. Or, aussitôt qu’on est divisé sur ce point, il est impossible de s’entendre sur le reste, et la différence des sentimens conduit nécessairement à un mépris réciproque. Réfléchis donc bien, et vois si tu es réellement d’accord avec moi, et si nous pouvons discuter en partant de ce principe, que, dans aucune circonstance, il n’est jamais permis d’être injuste, ni de rendre injustice pour injustice, et mal pour mal ; ou, si tu penses autrement, romps d’abord la discussion dans son principe. Pour moi, je pense encore aujourd’hui comme autrefois. Si tu as changé, dis‑le, et apprends‑moi tes motifs ; mais si tu restes fidèle à tes premiers sentimens, écoute ce qui suit :

CRITON.

Je persiste, Socrate, et pense toujours comme toi. Ainsi parle.

SOCRATE.

Je poursuis, ou plutôt je te demande : Un homme qui a promis une chose juste doit‑il la tenir, ou y manquer ?

CRITON.

Il doit la tenir.

SOCRATE.

Cela posé, examine maintenant cette question : En sortant d’ici sans le consentement des Athéniens, ne ferons‑nous point de mal à quelqu’un, et à ceux-là précisément qui le méritent le moins ? Tiendrons‑nous la promesse que nous avons faite, la croyant juste, ou y manquerons‑nous ?

CRITON.

Je ne saurais répondre à cette question, Socrate ; car je ne l’entends point.

SOCRATE.

Voyons si de cette façon tu l’entendras mieux. Au moment de nous enfuir, ou comme il te plaira d’appeler notre sortie, si les Lois et la République elle-même venaient se présenter devant nous et nous disaient : « Socrate, que vas‑tu faire ? L’action que tu prépares ne tend‑elle pas à renverser, autant qu’il est en toi, et nous et l’état tout entier ? car quel état peut subsister, où les jugemens rendus n’ont aucune force, et sont foulés aux pieds par les particuliers ? » que pourrions‑nous répondre, Criton, à ce reproche et à beaucoup d’autres semblables qu’on pourrait nous faire ? car que n’aurait‑on pas à dire, et surtout un orateur sur cette infraction à la loi, qui ordonne que les jugemens rendus seront exécutés[8] ? Répondrons-nous que la République nous a fait injustice, et qu’elle n’a pas bien jugé ? Est-ce là ce que nous répondrons ?

CRITON.

Oui, sans doute, Socrate, nous le dirons.

SOCRATE.

Et les lois que diront-elles ? « Socrate, est-ce de cela que nous sommes convenus ensemble, ou de te soumettre aux jugemens rendus par la république ? » Et si nous paraissions surpris de ce langage, elles nous diraient peut-être : « Ne t’étonne pas, Socrate ; mais répond-nous, puisque tu as coutume de procéder par questions et par réponses. Dis, quel sujet de plaintes as-tu donc contre nous et la République, pour entreprendre de nous détruire ? N’est‑ce pas nous à qui d’abord tu dois la vie ? N’est‑ce pas sous nos auspices que ton père prit pour compagne celle qui t’a donné le jour ? Parle ; sont-ce les lois relatives aux mariages qui te paraissent mauvaises ? — Non pas, dirais‑je. — Ou celles qui président à l’éducation, et suivant lesquelles tu as été élevé toi-même ? ont‑elles mal fait de prescrire à ton père de t’instruire dans les exercices de l’esprit et dans ceux du corps ? — Elles ont très bien fait. — Eh bien ! si tu nous doit la naissance et l’éducation, peux-tu nier que tu sois notre enfant et notre serviteur, toi et ceux dont tu descends ? et s’il en est ainsi, crois-tu avoir des droits égaux aux nôtres, et qu’il te soit permis de nous rendre tout ce que nous pourrions te faire souffrir ? Eh quoi ! à l’égard d’un père, où d’un maître si tu en avais un, tu n’aurais pas le droit de lui faire ce qu’il te ferait, de lui tenir des discours offensans, s’il t’injuriait ; de le frapper, s’il te frappait, ni rien de semblable ; et tu aurais ce droit envers les lois et la patrie ! et si nous avions prononcé ta mort, croyant qu’elle est juste, tu entreprendrais de nous détruire ! et, en agissant ainsi, tu croiras bien faire, toi qui as réellement consacré ta vie à l’étude de la vertu ! Ou ta sagesse va‑t‑elle jusqu’à ne pas savoir que la patrie a plus droit à nos respects et à nos hommages, qu’elle est et plus auguste et plus sainte devant les dieux et les hommes sages, qu’un père, qu’une mère et tous les aïeux ; qu’il faut respecter la patrie dans sa colère, avoir pour elle plus de soumission et d’égards que pour un père, la ramener par la persuasion ou obéir à ses ordres, souffrir, sans murmurer, tout ce qu’elle commande de souffrir ! fût‑ce d’être battu ou chargé de chaînes ; que, si elle nous envoie à la guerre pour y être blessés ou tués, il faut y aller ; que le devoir est là ; et qu’il n’est permis ni de reculer, ni de lâcher pied, ni de quitter son poste ; que, sur le champ de bataille, et devant le tribunal et partout, il faut faire ce que veut la république, ou employer auprès d’elle les moyens de persuasion que la loi accorde ; qu’enfin si c’est une impiété de faire violence à un père et à une mère, c’en est une bien plus grande de faire violence à la patrie ? » Que répondrons‑nous à cela, Criton ? reconnaîtrons‑nous que les Lois disent la vérité.

CRITON.
Le moyen de s’en empêcher ?
SOCRATE.

« Conviens donc, Socrate, continueraient-elles peut-être, que si nous disons la vérité, ce que tu entreprends contre nous est injuste. Nous t’avons fait naître, nous t’avons nourri et élevé ; nous t’avons fait, comme aux autres citoyens, tout le bien dont nous avons été capables ; et cependant, après tout cela, nous ne laissons pas de publier que tout Athénien, après nous avoir bien examinées et reconnu comment on est dans cette cité, peut, s’il n’est pas content, se retirer où il lui plaît, avec tout son bien : et si quelqu’un, ne pouvant s’accoutumer à nos manières, veut aller habiter ailleurs, ou dans une de nos colonies, ou même dans un pays étranger, il n’y a pas une de nous qui s’y oppose ; il peut aller s’établir où bon lui semble, et emporter avec lui sa fortune. Mais si quelqu’un demeure, après avoir vu comment nous administrions la justice, et comment nous gouvernons en général, dès là nous disons qu’il s’est de fait engagé à nous obéir ; et s’il y manque, nous soutenons qu’il est injuste de trois manières : il nous désobéit, à nous qui lui avons donné la vie ; il nous désobéit à nous qui sommes en quelque sorte ses nourrices ; enfin, il trahit la foi donnée, et se soustrait violemment à notre autorité, au lieu de la désarmer par la persuasion, et quand nous nous bornons à proposer, au lieu de commander tyranniquement, quand nous allons jusqu’à laisser le choix ou d’obéir ou de nous convaincre d’injustice, lui, il ne fait ni l’un ni l’autre. Voilà, Socrate, les accusations auxquelles tu t’exposes, si tu accomplis le projet que tu médites ; et encore seras‑tu plus coupable que tout autre citoyen. » Et si je leur demandais pour quelles raison, peut-être me fermeraient‑elles la bouche, en me rappelant que je me suis soumis plus que tout autre à ces conditions que je veux rompre aujourd’hui ; et nous avons, me diraient‑elles, de grandes marques que nous et la République nous étions selon ton cœur, car tu ne serais pas resté dans cette ville plus que tous les autres Athéniens, si elle ne t’avait été plus agréable qu’à eux tous. Jamais aucune des solennités de la Grèce n’a pu te faire quitter Athènes, si ce n’est une seule fois que tu es allé à l’Isthme de Corinthe[9] ; tu n’es sorti d’ici que pour aller à la guerre ; tu n’as jamais entrepris aucun voyage, comme c’est la coutume de tous les hommes, tu n’as jamais eu la curiosité de voir une autre ville, de connaître d’autres lois ; mais nous t’avons toujours suffi, nous et notre gouvernement. Telle était ta prédilection pour nous, tu consentais si bien à vivre selon nos maximes, que même tu as eu des enfans dans cette ville, témoignage assuré qu’elle te plaisait. Enfin, pendant ton procès, il ne tenait qu’à toi de te condamner à l’exil, et de faire alors, de notre aveu, ce que tu entreprends aujourd’hui malgré nous. Mais tu affectais de voir la mort avec indifférence ; tu disais la préférer à l’exil ; et maintenant, sans égard pour ces belles paroles, sans respect pour nous, pour ces lois, dont tu médites la ruine, tu vas faire ce que ferait le plus vil esclave, en tâchant de t’enfuir, au mépris des conventions et de l’engagement sacré qui te soumet à notre empire. Réponds-nous donc d’abord sur ce point : disons nous la vérité, lorsque nous soutenons que tu t’es engagé, non en paroles, mais en effet, à reconnaître nos décisions ? Cela est‑il vrai, ou non ? » Que répondre, Criton, et comment faire pour ne pas en convenir ?

CRITON.

Il le faut bien, Socrate !

SOCRATE.

« Et que fais‑tu donc, continueraient‑elles, que de violer le traité qui te lie à nous, et de fouler aux pieds tes engagements ? et pourtant tu ne les as contractés ni par force, ni par surprise, ni sans avoir eu le temps d’y penser ; mais voilà bien soixante-dix années pendant lesquelles il t’était permis de te retirer, si tu n’étais pas satisfait de nous, et si les conditions du traité ne te paraissaient pas justes. Tu n’as préféré ni Lacédémone, ni la Crète, dont tous les jours tu vantes le gouvernement, ni aucune autre ville grecque ou étrangère ; tu es même beaucoup moins sorti d’Athènes que les boiteux, les aveugles, et les autres estropiés ; tant il est vrai que tu as plus aimé que tout autre Athénien, et cette ville, et nous aussi apparemment, car qui pourrait aimer une ville sans lois ? Et aujourd’hui, tu serais infidèle à tes engagements ! Non, si du moins tu nous en crois, et tu ne t’exposeras pas à la dérision en abandonnant ta patrie ; car, vois un peu, nous te prions, si tu violes tes engagements et commets une faute pareille, quel bien il t’en reviendra à toi et à tes amis. Pour tes amis, il est à-peu-près évident qu’ils seront exposés au danger, ou d’être bannis et privés du droit de cité, ou de perdre leur fortune ; et pour toi, si tu te retires dans quelque ville voisine, à Thèbes ou à Mégare, comme elles sont bien policées tu y seras comme un ennemi ; et tout bon citoyen t’y aidera d’un œil de défiance, te prenant pour un corrupteur des lois. Ainsi tu accréditeras toi-même l’opinion que tu as été justement condamné ; car tout corrupteur des lois passera aisément pour corrupteur des jeunes gens et des faibles. Eviteras‑tu ces villes bien policées, et la société des hommes de bien ? Mais alors est‑ce la peine de vivre ? ou si tu les approches, que leur diras-tu, Socrate, auras‑tu le front de leur répéter ce que tu disais ici, qu’il ne doit rien y avoir pour l’homme au‑dessus de la vertu, de la justice, des lois et de leurs décisions ? Mais peux‑tu espérer qu’alors le rôle de Socrate ne paraisse pas honteux ? Non, tu ne peux l’espérer. Mais tu t’éloigneras de ces villes bien policées, et tu iras en Thessalie, chez les amis de Criton ; car c’est le pays du désordre et de la licence, et peut‑être y prendra-t‑on un singulier plaisir à t’entendre raconter la manière plaisante dont tu t’es échappé de cette prison, enveloppé d’un manteau, ou couvert d’une peau de bête, ou déguisé d’une manière ou d’une autre, comme font tous les fugitifs, et tout-à-fait méconnaissable. Mais personne ne s’avisera-t-il de remarquer qu’à ton âge, ayant peu de temps à vivre selon toute apparence, il faut que tu aies bien aimé la vie pour y sacrifier les lois les plus saintes ? Non, peut-être, si tu ne choques personne ; autrement, Socrate, il te faudra entendre bien des choses humiliantes. Tu vivras dépendant de tous les hommes, et rampant devant eux. Et que feras-tu en Thessalie que de traîner ton oisiveté de festin en festin, comme si tu n’y étais allé que pour un souper ? Alors que deviendront tous ces discours sur la justice et toutes les autres vertus ? Mais peut-être veux-tu te conserver pour tes enfans, afin de pouvoir les élever ? Quoi donc ! est-ce en les emmenant en Thessalie que tu les élèveras, en les rendant étrangers à leur patrie, pour qu’ils t’aient encore cette obligation ? ou si tu les laisses à Athènes, seront-ils mieux élevés, quand tu ne seras pas avec eux, parce que tu seras en vie ? Mais tes amis en auront soin ? Quoi ! ils en auront soin si tu vas en Thessalie, et si tu vas aux enfers ils n’en auront pas soin ! Non, Socrate, si du moins ceux qui se disent tes amis valent quelque chose ; et il faut le croire. Socrate, suis les conseils de celles qui t’ont nourri : ne mets ni tes enfans, ni ta vie, ni quelque chose que ce puisse être au-dessus de la justice, et quand tu arriveras aux enfers, tu pourras plaider ta cause devant les juges que tu y trouveras ; car si tu fais ce qu’on te propose sache que tu n’amélioreras tes affaires, ni dans ce monde, ni dans l’autre. Et subissant ton arrêt, tu meurs victime honorable de l’iniquité, non des lois, mais des hommes ; mais, si tu fuis, si tu repousses sans dignité l’injustice par l’injustice, le mal par le mal, si tu violes le traité qui t’obligeait envers nous, tu mets en péril ceux que tu devais protéger, toi, tes amis, ta patrie et nous. Tu nous auras pour ennemies pendant ta vie, et quand tu descendras chez les morts, nos sœurs, les lois des enfers, ne t’y feront pas un accueil trop favorable, sachant que tu as fait tous ces efforts pour nous détruire. Ainsi, que Criton n’ait pas sur toi plus de pouvoir que nous, et ne préfère pas ses conseils aux nôtres. »

Tu crois entendre ces accents, mon cher Criton, comme ceux que Cybèle inspire croient entendre les flûtes sacrées[10] : le son de ces paroles retentit dans mon âme, et me rend insensible à tout autre discours ; et sache qu’au moins dans ma disposition présente, tout ce que tu pourras me dire contre sera inutile. Cependant si tu crois pouvoir y réussir, parle.

CRITON.
Socrate, je n’ai rien à dire.
SOCRATE.

Laissons donc cette discussion, mon cher Criton, et marchons sans rien craindre par où Dieu nous conduit.

Notes[modifier]

  1. Voyez le commencement du Phèdon.
  2. Promontoire de l’Attique, vis-à-vis les Cyclades.
  3. Les onze.
  4. HOMÈRE, Iliade, liv. IX, v. 363.
  5. Personnage du Phédon. Diogène Laërce cite les titres de trente-trois Dialogues qui lui étaient attribués.
  6. Personnage du Phédon. Il avait composé trois Dialogues dont il ne nous reste qu’un seul, le Tableau.
  7. Allusion à un entretien antérieur.
  8. DÉMOSTHÈNE, Dicours contre Timarch., page 718, édit, Reiske.
  9. C’est là qu’on célébrait les jeux Isthmiques en l’honneur de Neptune.
  10. Les Corybantes, prêtres de Cybèle, avec des cymbales et surtout avec des flûtes, troublaient la raison de ceux qui prenaient part à leurs fêtes, et les rendaient insensibles à toute autre impression que celle de la flûte (Voyez l’Ion).